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How to care for Your Furniture


While nothing lasts forever, with proper maintenance your new finish will last a long time.


Acrylic

Use only a very soft damp cloth when cleaning acrylic surfaces. It is possible to scratch acrylic, so NEVER use any scouring compounds or chemical cleaners such as Windex or other glass cleaners (even if they are environmentally friendly, organic or non-scented). Should anything ever stick to an acrylic surface (such as an adhesive label or gummy substance) do not use any type of solvent. A mild soap a nd water combination will take care of most cleaning needs, although there are numerous products on the market to help r epair any small scratches your piece may get.

Never use the same cloth that you clean other household items with it can retain dirt, grit, and chemical residues that may harm your acrylic items. We recommend using a new or separate cloth for yo ur acrylic care.


Wood

Wood veneer is a thin sheet of natural wood that covers the surface of some types of furniture. It provides the look of hardwood furniture without the high cost. The durability of wood veneer varies depending on the type of wood it's made from, and it requires gentle care to preserve the finish. Clean it with mild products and avoid the use of wax or oil-based polishes to prevent buildup. Keep wood ve neer furniture out of direct sunlight to prevent fading and use beverage coasters to prevent water damage.


How to clean your wood veneer finish:


Step 1: Dampen a cotton or microfiber cloth with water and wring it out. Wipe the wood veneer, following the direction of the wood grain, to remove any light dust, debris or residue. Wipe the veneer with a dry cotton or microfiber cloth to dry it.


Step 2: Remove tough dirt or residue from wood veneer with a mixture of 1 teaspoon of oil soap or mild soap flakes with 2 cups of warm water. Dip a cotton or microfiber cloth into the solution and wring it o ut. Wi pe the wood veneer in small sections to clean it thoroughly.


Step 3: Rinse the cloth thoroughly with water and wring it out. Wipe the wood veneer with the cloth to remove any soap residue. Dry the wood veneer with a clean, dry cloth.


Lacquer

Lacquer is a delicate finish that with proper care will last a long time. Lacquer and polyester finishes is best maintained by simple dusting with a slightly dampened rag (using only very soft, clean cloths and wiping with light pressure). Never immerse in water. Also, do not use commercial products such as Pledge or Endust, which may permanently ruin the lacquer finish.

To keep lacquer finish looking pristine, spills must be cleaned as soon as they happen with a clean soft cloth. Plastic and rubber surfaces can leave etchings into lacquer finishes. This is most likely with newer finishes, but sometimes happens with fully cured finishes as well. For this reason we recommend that telephones, televisions, radios, plastic place mats, plastic cups and plastic tablecloths, etc. be kept from long-term contact with any finish. It is important to protect your lacquer finish from scratches by always using felt pads under all accessories. We also recommend not leaving anything heavy, on top of your newly finished furniture for extended time during at least the first 30 days. Your new finish is at 85% of its total strength as delivered, but will continue to cure and strengthen during that time. This doesnt mean you can’t use you’re your table immediately after delivery, but clear the table afterwards.


Remember, anything harder than your finish (Glass, ceramic, or metal) will scratch it, e specially during the first month. It is also advisable avoiding exposure to direct sunlight, extremes of temperature and humidity, and abrasion. Exposure to direct light discolors the surface and dulls the lacquer’s sheen.


Too many finishes are ruined by over applying polish, wax, and oil. We do not recommend using any oil to clean your lacquer or wood finish. To remove smudges and fingerprints, first dust using the damp/dry cloths as above. If heavier cleaning is necessary, dampen your cloth with a small amount of mild soap solution and make sure you remove any residues with a soft damp cloth immediately after.


If lacquer objects require cleaning or repair beyond these basic steps, contact an experienced lacquer specialist.


Leather and Hide

Leather surfaces are just like beautiful, delicate skin. Leather must be carefully cleansed before it can be properly conditioned. As leather ages, it loses essential protector infused into the leather during the manufacturing process. That leaves the leather susceptible to dirt, oils, and UV damage. To keep leather looking and feeling its best, you must first clean it and then replace the lost moisture and protection.


Easy steps to Proper Leather Care


Step 1: The basic care routine for leather upholstery is simply wiping the furniture down with a dry cotton cloth. This will remove dust from the leather and keep it looking its best.


Step 2: Vacuum dust and debris from the furniture's crevices. Just as with any other piece of upholstered furniture, the best way to remove the dust and debris that gradually builds up in crevices and under cushions is by using your vacuum's hose attachment. No special precautions are necessary when vacuuming leather furniture.


Step 3: Apply a leather conditioner regularly. The most notable difference between caring for leather versus fabric upholstery is the need to condition the leather. Leather conditioners are products that have a creamy consistency and are designed to be buffed into the leather. Conditioning the leather regularly keeps it from drying out and developing cracks.
Leather conditioner can be purchased from many general stores and is also available at auto parts stores, where it is sold for conditioning leather car interiors.

Application guidelines will vary from product to product. In general, you should expect to condition your leather furniture once every 6 to 12 months.


Step 4: Clean spills immediately with a dry cloth. W hen anything is spilled onto the leather upholstery, wipe it away as soon as possible. Use a dry cloth or sponge to absorb as m uch of the spilled liquid as possible, only resorting to a moistened cloth if absolutely necessary. Use as little water as possible to clean the spill, and wipe the area dry afterwards.


Step 5: Avoid soaking the leather in water or soap. Unlike fabric upholsteries, leather should never be cleaned by prolonged soaking in soap or water. Doing this can damage the leather even more than the initial stain you are trying to remove.


Tips to avoid Leather damage

Tip 1: Avoid placing leather furniture in direct sunlight. Virtually nothing is safe for long in the light and heat of the sun. Remember sunlight damages leather, think of leather just like your skin, only without the ability to repair itself. Try to keep leather furniture away from direct sunlight or when that isnt possible, condition exposed areas more often. Avoid extreme temperatures that would cause leather to dry and crack. If you're too cold or too hot in a room, so is the leather. Don't place leather next to air conditioners or radiators.


Tip 2: Buff small scratches in the leather with a micro fiber cloth. Because leather is made from animal hide, it can occasionally dry out and develop small cracks and scratches. These scratches can be coaxed into hiding themselves, however. All you need to do is buff them gently with a microfiber cloth until their appearance fades.


Tip 3: Like all furniture, leather is of course prone to irreparable damage from chewing and scratching by pets. This effect is best minimized by providing pets with chew toys, scratching posts, and other appropriate outlets for their chewing and scratching.


Tip 4: Place your leather furniture at a fair distance from flaming heat and sharp edges. Be careful with objects with sharp edges inside your pockets such as keys and pocket knives. Use care when smoking; accidents may happen leaving cigarette burns on your sofa.


Tip 5: Avoid using any cleaning products not designed for leather. Detergents, solvents, all-purpose cleaning sprays, ammonia, bleach, and furniture polish can all be harmful to leather furniture. Do not apply these products in an attempt to clean the furniture or remove stains. Rely on dry towels or sponges as much as possible. Do not use classic Pledge or any other dusting spray on your leather furniture. Over time you will create a build up that will be a nightmare to remove without damaging the leather.


Tip 6: Do not use oils or varnishes on leather.


Tip 7: Do not use soap on leather. If soap must be used to remove a stain, try a very mild one, look for a "Saddle Soap". Then wipe the area several times with a barely damp rag, dry, and then condition. Soap breaks down the oils that keep the leather supple.


Tip 8: Do not use an excessive amount of water on leather furniture. This may create a stain larger than the original problem.


Tip 9: Do not use solvents such as rubbing alcohol on leather furniture. If rubbing alcohol is applied with a q-tip to remove ball point pen marks, be sure to condition the area properly as soon as possible.


Tip 10: Sweat, hair oil, and skin care products like benzoyl peroxide are not good for leather. Use a pillow instead of the arm when lying down to watch TV.


Tip 11: Leather stretches out, but not back: If you start to overfill a wallet, it will never really return to i ts former taut self. If you stretch a leather bag when wet or very humid, it will move even faster. Just learn to carry the right amount, and this takes care of itself. The same happens with your leather sofa; avoid placing a lot of weight on a spot as it will leave creases in the leather.


Tip 12: Dark jeans and other clothes may stain your white or light color leather. Color transfer stains can also be caused by hair dyes, newspapers and magazines. Avoid direct contact of stain sources with your leather sofa. If a stain occurs try to clean it immediately by following the leather cleaning care steps above.


Stainless Steel

Stainless steel does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does, but despite the name it is not fully stain-proof, most notably under low oxygen, high salinity, or poor circulation environments. We recommend buying Stainless Steel Cleaner and following the instructions for any cleaning and polishing needs you have.


Stone

Finishes: There are three primary stone finishes:

1. A polished finish has a glossy surface that reflects light and emphasizes the color and markings of the material.

2. A honed finish is a satin smooth surface with relatively little reflection of light. Generally, a honed finish is preferred for floors, stair treads, thresholds, and other locations where heavy traffic will wear off the polished finish.

A honed finish may also be used on furniture tops and other surfaces.

3. A flamed finish is a rough textured surface


Marble

Clean marble with a clean, slightly damp cloth and then dry with a soft towel. Avoid bleach, acidic cleaners or any abrasive household cleaners with marble, as etching and dullness may occur. Never leave a chemical, citric or acidic item or substance on the marble and use felt pads or runners to prevent items from scratching the surface.


Granite

Clean with a clean, damp cloth and use a small amount of soapy water for heavy residue or debris. Avoid ammonia, bleach or any cleaning products with solvents or caustics, as this will remove the sealant.


Outdoor Furniture

Our quality synthetic wicker strands have a UV proofing that helps it resist fading, when combined with quality powder coated aluminum frame and outdoor fabrics furniture will keep its color far longer than traditional outdoor furniture. In order to keep you furniture in the best condition some maintenance is required.


How to clean your outdoor furniture:


Step 1: Rinse off the synthetic wicker on a regular basis. The air is full of dirt, dust and grit, here in South Florida it is also full of salt; all of these items will over time cause issues to anything left outside. You do not need any special soaps, just a quick rinse. Rain is also full of pollutants that can harm your furniture, just because it rained doesn't mean the furniture is clean.


Step 2: If you will be away for an extended period of time clean and store the items to preserve their lifespan.


Step 3: Our Outdoor Fabric does not promote mildew growth, however, mildew may grow on dirt and other foreign substances that are not removed from the fabric. We recommend washing your outdoor cushion covers on a semi regular basis to improve the look and life of the pieces.


Tip 1: Machine wash in cold water. Depending on wash load size, use recommended amounts of mild laundry detergent on a gentle setting.

Tip 2: Do Not put in the dryer.

Tip 3: Do Not Dry Clean.

Tip 4: When you have removed and washed the covers of the pillows, also rinse the pillows themselves and let air dry.


Rugs

Cowhide

Care & C leaning:


Vacuum regularly to remove dust as with any regular rug. If a stain should occur it can be removed by soft brushing and rubbing the grain of the hair with mild soap and water.


We recommend you do not place your hide under direct sun light and to rotate your hide every 3 months in high traffic areas.


Shag

Care & C leaning:


Step 1: Vacuum regularly to remove dust and dirt.


Step 2: Spot Removal is one of the most crucial areas of rug maintenance, and acting quickly when anything is spilled or dropped makes cleaning easier.

Tip 1: Immediately blot spills with paper towels or a clean cloth and remove any solids.

Tip 2: Pretest any cleaning agent in a small unobtrusive area.

Tip 3: Work inward from the spot to the center to prevent spreading.

Tip 4: Wait a few minutes for the cleaning agent to work on the spot. Follow recommended directions of the cleaner you used.

Tip 5: After the cleaning agent has removed the spot, blot excess moisture with paper towels or a clean cloth.

Tip 6: Rinse with clean water and blot excess moisture with paper towels or a clean cloth.




Stain Treatment C hart

Spot

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Alcoholic Drink

1

2

-

Blood

1

2

-

Butter

3

2

-

Candle Wax

6

4

-

Gum

4

3

-

Coffee

1

2

3

Soda

1

2

-

Cream

2

3

-

Floor Wax

3

2

-

Gravy & Sauce

5

2

3

Ink (fountain pen)

1

2

-

Ink (ball Point)

4

7

2

Lipstick

3

2

-

Milk

5

3

2

Nail Polish

6

3

-

Oil & Grease

3

2

-

Latex Paint

1

2

3

Oil Paint

9

3

2

Rust

3

2

8

Salad Dressing

2

3

-

Shoe Polish

3

2

-

Tar

3

-

-

Urine (fresh)

1

2

-

Urine (old)

1

2

10

Wine

9

1

2

For each Stain listed to the right, apply the steps below.

1. Add cold water and blot

2. Detergent Solution or WoolClean Dry©

3. Mineral Spirits or Turpentine

4. Chill with aerosol Freezing Spray

or Ice in a bag; follow by picking gum out

5. Warm Water

6. Nail Polish remover

7. Isopropyl Alcohol

8. Rust Remover

9. Absorbent Powder (i.e. Salt, talc...)

10 Absorbent cleaner